About your Search

20121225
20121225
SHOW
Book TV 21
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 48
SFGTV2 42
CSPAN2 22
FBC 12
KPIX (CBS) 12
KTVU (FOX) 11
KGO (ABC) 10
CNNW 8
KQED (PBS) 8
CSPAN 7
KRCB (PBS) 6
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 6
MSNBCW 5
KICU 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 223
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 226 (some duplicates have been removed)
incompass taits that is false. when use as intended they cause pain and as we have seen across the nation they pose a risk of serious jury or death. >> as you have heard today, in particular people with mental health problem are more likely to be at high risk of death, and with that high population in san francisco and coming in contact often with the san francisco police department, we don't want to run a risk of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just some follow up
you are daoeg with the mental health community i don't think that using tasers on them, unless the circumstances is the best way to go about it. >> thank you. >> >> before the next speaker i will call out a few more karls. >> wilson, miller, alicia rubin aver and cavera and perez and buller. >> thanks. >> hello, my name is gary and i am from the san francisco drug users union and my comment is going to be short and sweet. this argument over non-lethal tasers and non-lethal protection for the officers and up against the mentally ill and challenged, has been going on for years. tasers are as lethal as any gun, a gun is just as non-lethal as a tase and her if you spent half of the money that you have spent on conversation, debates ps, surveys and documentation and a little meetings like this, back into the mental health facility and the hospitals and the non-the homeless shelters and get these people off the street, these officers are going to have not have half of the problems that is where the money should be going instead of the ridiculous conversations. thank you. >> thank you
. and at the time we were asked to consider an alternative design using concrete rather than the scheme that was potentially planned for previous to that, which was a steel frame structure that used hydraulic dampers to control seismic motion. >> so, i met with my team. we worked hard. we came up with a great idea. let's take out the heavy steel structure, let's put in an innovative vertical post tension concrete structure, great idea. we did that. a lot of other things. and we came up with a price of 140 million. so, we achieved that goal. and, so, when we first started looking at the building, it was going to cost a lot of money. because of the way it was being built, we could only get 12 floors. we wanted more space for our employees. we ended up going and saying, okay, if we do a concrete building instead, which was web core's idea, we can get 13 floors, not 12 floors. the concrete doesn't require much space between the floors as a steel building does. and it could be cheaper. yes, more space, less money, great idea. ♪ ♪ >> we know that right now there are things happening in po
have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids refle
would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are moving on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that san francisco is the world champion when it comes to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it
photojournalists. through their lens, they bring us a spirit of the season from all around the bay area. we're here at christmas in the park in san jose. not far from where our first story takes place. in 1983, the town was hit hard by the el nino flood. the tragedy prompted a south bay family to give rather than receive. joe and judy santiago set out to spread cheer with a box of candy canes. as photojournalist chris paxton shows us you, 20 years r later, the generosity continue -- shows us, 20 years later, the generosity continues to grow. >> here's something. >> can we do this? >> we keep track of them. >> by boys and girls by age group and year. >> happy new year! >> the gifts we give out are from infants to 13-year-olds. last year, we probably had 15 cars loaded up with gifts. you people are so awesome, we really appreciate this. the kids just loved meeting santa claus. >> he's excited. >> how many for santa? >> the family gets their picture taken with santa. >> big smile. there you go. >> merry christmas. >> what you want for christmas? >> a monster truck, a real one. >> we have probably abou
're not just a bureaucratic agency. we have sensitivity. we have people who work for us who are supposed to be there helping protect these people. it really broke through new ground for us. >> let's take another question -- it is great to have these kind of specifics. go ahead and identify yourself -- >> i am an international baccalaureate. thank you for your comments and you have a lot of wisdom and forgiving as a glimpse into the human side of things. with as many women who have reached panicles of their career and for those like yourself, is there a new path beyond that? once you reach the pinnacle, what can we expect to see of women who have accomplished a lot? do you retire into personal life or is that there are some other pathway once they leave their position? >> what are you going to do next? >> the women i have come across have -- who have also reached those high platitudes, they continue to be active, for the most part. i think this new environment, be it political or social environment has changed. people want to do more. sometimes people will do it as volunteers. want to be
>> you don't know us investigating reporting. the point we've seen over the years is not just economics. it's was caused administering because it's troublesome. ..'s watch live sunday january 6th at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> coming up booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we interview authors. acclaimed inventor ray kurzweil and his latest book, how to create a mind:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engi
-- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to the public utilities commission and ask the public utilities commission in about february to adopted -- not to exceed rates. it's our projected rate that is behind that bill premium i showed you, and that will begin the statutory rate sett
perception in many instances. with that being said, do i want to use weapons that are only about pain compliance or use a weapon system that is about controlling and stopping that person from doing any further aggressive behavior than what they are doing and our policy is if you look at the policy. it is not about using the policy against someone who is simply non-compliant. that would be a violation of the policy. it is about using potentially that weapon system against someone who is active, state of aggression towards the officers and or the public themselves. so, with that said, it is a weapon system that controls as opposed to uses pain as a means of acquiring compliance. >> i have a couple of follow ups, but i know that the chair has a question. >> actually this probably dove tails with his questions, but for all of us to really understand, could you explain how electronic controlled weapon, a taser works? >> it works by simply, capturing the electrical systems within your muscles and basically constricting your muscles. >> but mechanically, you fire something? >> there are two
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
.. >> thank you mr. mayor. (applause). . >> yeah, mayorly thank you very much for the letting us use your house here tonight and letting -- we really appreciate it we know that you ran from the game to get here and so we really appreciate your commitment to our community and we are happy that you are here to celebrate this momentous day with us. we have an awesome community here, we are here to celebrate the awesomeness of our community the dedication of our community and, you know we are hebe here to serve all of you so really this award should go to everybody here in our community. thank you very much. (applause). >>> and i just want to echo jeff's words and say thank you for having us here today and thank you all for joining us and we look forward to many more arab heritage month celebrations and as well as our bigger community center and you know, through all of the different work that we do in different arab organization, different community organizationings it's about strengthening our community and contributing to the amazing cultural land scam of our city and we are very thank
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
elected i have always appreciated that you have mentoring those of us who are entering into the field after you and not a lot of elected officials do that to give their advise and support and i appreciate the support that you have given to me and i also want to say that i have an incredible apt of respect fortitude you have and the honesty and the way you carry yourself as-woman and a woman leader and it's rare to see that type of leadership and those of us in this field admire those qualities about and you see how incredible you have moving through a lot of different types of politics and fundraisings and lots of other things and so i want to thank you again for being that role-model and i appreciate what you have done. >> supervisor kim, i also want to add a few words for myself. fee i don't evenna you [spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take a moment to colleagues remind
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles definitely need to be treated differently, and certainly
conference santa clara. he said you shouldn't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned me up the next day. can we cut $40 million out of this project? it was one person more responsible than any others, it's tony irons, was the architect that was responsible for the revitalization of city hall who came to my office and said, we cannot abandon this. we can't walk away from this project. we have an opportunity to really take a lot of our values and principles, particularly raising the bar as we did as a city on our green building standards, mandating the most aggressive green building standards for private construction anywhere in the united states. and showcasing them in this new building. >> the city for the sfpuc, it was critical that the building stay as a lead building. the easiest thing to do to cut out millions of dollars, let's just go from lead platinum to lead gold. but that wasn't the objective. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilitie
: that's it for tonight's willis report. thanks for joining us, i hope you and your families all have a safe and a very, very merry lou: there is the least three doubles and lawsuits, however, challenging obamacare, including the requirement that workplace health plans cover birth control. pennsylvania, the latest to announce it will not have the obamacare insurance exchange, becoming the 22nd state to set up the exchange, leaving it up to the federal government government to implement exchanges. the president's health care law was so unpopular when the president signed it into law and it remains absolutely that two years later. apparently nancy pelosi was right about the obamacare program, at least when she uttered these now infamous words, calling for passage of the legislation. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. away from the father of the controversy. lou: is getting rid of obamacare so one option for republicans? we will talk with legal analyst peter johnson on the way forward. also, the worsening political crisis in egypt. splitting egypt between
are actually reading the entire e i r because i think most of us skim through the e i r's and skim through and but i doubt that most of us go through the e i r's and you turned to me and said, this is actually my third time reading it. that was a standard you set a bar for me when you is he that to me and that was a bar that i felt i had to be able to come close to may be not the third time but, i really do respect that. i have always admired your dedication and the faint that you don't lie to come in unprepared to an ortho argument and i do apologize that i was not able to replace chris daily in that role to continue the lively debates and discussion that is had happened prior to me. i know that you used to be -- there used to be that diagonal dynamic that habe is not as in existence as it was in the past but i'll say one thing sean, in admire ages i did not find that appeal on your birthday and i hope you remember that one when i call on you your birthday when i call on you in work ring for the city and county of fraction and also i have a lot of respect for your love and dedication t
visit us onli >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city's transit first policy. and what our goal, what the city's goal and the transit first policy is is to make sure that everybody can get around san francisco, that everyone can get to where they need to go. it is an important part of making the economy of san francisco work, to making the quality of life good and better. but it's not just get around san francisco any old way. this is san francisco, and we have values that we bring to our transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportat
olympic team will fly to london on the american planes and this makes us richard? >> people don't get that. one could argue the uniforms were not manufactured in china, but grown in the soybean market and i was. they get bter wages we have lower prices. john: if made in america of people would be poor. another myth. overpopulation. asia is four. africa is for. >> the problem is not there are too many people but they don't have fried government's. look at the population data. i hear about nigeria because of of -- overpopulation. they have 174 people per square mile. that is half of the netherlands and they are rich. one-tenth ofongkong and singapore and they are really which. >> the resource is the mind. john: more people more brains. >> more people closer together means more conversations. john: i have been told we're running out ofuel. jimmy carter said that. it would have been within the next decade, 30 years ago. >> that implies a prices should be rising. of decades oil has been getting cheaper and cheaper. even if it does get cheaper people look for a substitute. they keep inventing ne
>>> weaker yen, stronger dollar. the u.s. currency is trading at the upper yen level. that's the highest lel in 24 months. the dollar yen is strading at 84.74 to 75 in tokyo. earlier the dollar hit 84.96 yen at one stage. investigato investors are buying yen. >> the central bank will face further pressure. >> we're going to get some more answers as the new administrati administration launches on wednesday. the ps is on. he's talking about revising the law to set target of 2%. >> we think the yen we think it's supporting for weaker yen. european debt concern should be eased things to esm. >> let's get a check on how tokyo stocks are reacting. it's currently at 10,094. a gain of 1.6% from friday's close. many analysts think the trend will continue. in other business headlines the rate of unpaid tensipensions inn hit a record high. around 26% or more than 4.5 million of those enrolled failed to pay premiums between april 2009 and march 2011. 74% said they couldn't pay because the premium is too high. 10% refuse to pay because they couldn't trust the system. the monthly premium
in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch
meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhan
anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass
you today. thanks for inviting us in and showing us your amazing facility today. >> my pleasure. >> how long has electric works been around? >> electric works has been in san francisco since the beginning of 2007. we moved here from brisbane from our old innovation. we do printmaking, gallery shows, and we have a fabulous retail store where there are lots of fun things to find. >> we will look at all of that as we walk around. it is incredible to me how many different things you do. how is it you identify that san francisco was in need of all these different services? >> it came from stepping out of graduate school in 1972. i wrote a little thing about how this is an idea, how our world should work. it should have printmaking, archiving, a gallery. it should have a retail store. in 1972, i wanted to have art sales, point-of-sale at the grocery store. >> so you go through the manifesto. with the bay area should have. you are making art incredibly accessible in so many different ways, so that is a good segue. let's take a walk around the facilities. here we are in your gallery spa
this morning. so glad all of you are joining us, for a little bit of your christmas holiday. robin, of course, at home recovering. saying hello to you, between the toes. george also at home with his family. great to be joined by my compatriots, lara and sam on this christmas holiday. >> great to have you both in my life. and wishing you a really wonderful morning. today on the show, we have a christmas morning roundtable, with spiritual leaders, discussing faith in our lives right now. it's an important discussion to have right now. we look forward to that. >>> also ahead this morning, you know her from "dancing with the stars." katherine jenkins is here with a sa song that is absolutely perfect for this morning, christmas morning. i can't even bring myself to say shh because her voice is so incredible. >> it stops you in your tracks. >> i know. i could listen to it all morning. >>> something we want to show you. these kids, there's a surprise on the way. they don't know it, but santa is going to visit. >> making his way down the chimney, i believe, as we speak. we are pretaping the show, so
of the most important things of all. thanks for joining us. we'll see you next time. [applause] (male announcer) live from the kron 4 news station, this is the kron 4 news. >> good morning on this christmas. we are taking a live look outside at the golden gate bridge. the bay area is gearing up for another round of storms. we'll be checking in with anny who has a look at our forecast in just a few minutes. but first. it will be a white christmas in many states as powerful winter storms move across the country. that could lead to travel delays on the ground and in the air. ed payne has the story. >> the flight crews run out ins door road crews-ahead of the expected christmas storm appeared similar, in oklahoma, where the will rogers airport flights have been cancelled. mark clayton burke >> when we start clearing this, it is typically a rule crew o 9-12 people to live with the use a high- tech survey crew that makes sure that the ice is going to be safe. the mice can be difficult to teach. >> spring killed, missouri are preparing for the storm that could dump 8-inches. salt-truck is ex
are staffed by the sfgtv and could you share with us your announcements? >> please, make sure to silence all cell phones and complete the speaker cards and any documents to be included as part of the file should be submitted to the clerk, the items acted upon will appear on the january 13th, 2013, agenda unless otherwise stated. >> could you call items. >> hearing to review the san francisco police department and general orders related to tasers including the department's plan to equipment the officers and the crisis intervention team with tasers. >> thank you, madam clerk. we are just joined by supervisor eric mar, this is a hearing that i called forward in the context of having years dialogue about the use of tasers or electronic controlled weapons in san francisco. this is something that has been taken up in this time, by the police commission, but since, it is discussion that is happening ongoing, with many of our committees across san francisco, i wanted to bring it forward as a hearing to be able to get some input from the board of supervisors and also to hear what plans are from the p
that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew, who is here tonight. i want him to see me so he can follow my footsteps sunday to give back to the community. with me here are my managers and supervisors. i also have my longtime friend, jamie, who has been here. i see my former boss here. i have been nominated so many times. it really feels like you won an oscar. lastly, i wanted to thank my husband, who has been not just a husband to me, but he has been my chauffeur -- [laughter] mi
the u.s. currency hits a 20-month high against the yen. investors are keeping a keen eye on how far the dollar will go against the yen. the u.s. currency reached the upper 84-yen level in new york for the first time in 20 months. the dollar hit 84.95 yen at one stage on monday in new york. investors bought the dollar against the yen after liberal democratic party leader shinzo abe said his new government may reach an agreement with japan's central bank on an inflation target. there is speculation the central bank may come under further pressure for monetary easing measures. the dollar/yen is currently trading at 84.82 to 85. >> catherine, the incoming leader abe has even mentioned revising the bank of japan law which adds more pressure onto the central bank of japan. now, a bit of background, the boj decided last week to extend its asset purchase program by 10 trillion yen, but many investors think the bank needs to do more, still. let's go to ramin mellegard who is at the tokyo stock exchange to get a check on how all of this is affecting tokyo markets. ramin, good morning. >> good
. >> thanks for waking up with us, god bless and merry christmas. >> merry christmas. >> good morning, everyone. i have the biggest smile on my nice because it's december 25th. merry christmas to all all viewers across the country, around the world and to our servicemen and women keeping us safe overseas today and their families. i want to show you a live look of presiden bethlehem, we'll be back there in a moment. i'm jaime colby. >> i'm kelly wright, we are glad your here. >> we have a very important show ahead. fox news alert in upstate new york as authorities piece together what led to a gunman opening fire yesterday on christmas eve at four firefighters ballistic link and i tense inferno. police say the gunman set his house on fire to lure the first responders, then proceeded to ambush them, killing two and occurring two others. the gunman dent find as an ex-con then willed himself. police have the gruesome task of looking for more victims in the charred ruins. >> the fire has it under control. there are seven houses totally distrade at the scene. there is still an active crime s
very competitive. >> but everyone should be encouraged to apply. thank you again for hosting us. >> thank you for including us in "culturewire." ♪ z. >> the meeting will come to order. this is the monday, december 10, 2012 meeting of the land development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. it's our last meeting of the year. my name is eric mar, chairman of the committee, our clerk is miss alisa miller. miss miller, are there announcements for us? >> please make sure to silence all cell phones and electronic devices. items acted upon today will appear on the january 15th board of supervisors agenda unless otherwise stated. >> thank you, i'd like to thank sfgtv which televises us each meeting. i'd like to say we have 7 items on the agenda today. madam clerk, please call item 1. >> item 1 is a resolution granting a street encroachment at 54 peralta avenue for construction of a driveway ramp. >> sponsor is david chiu and from dpw we have david qwan >> my name is eleanor tapk and i am with the department of public works. our office received a major encroach
of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris and another famous piedmonter austin tichner. talk about enlightening. he dubbed our large room the triple occupancy club. little did i know this came with the added bonus of an extracurricular education in the arts. chris arrived with his stack of lps, many courtesy of his step dad, bob. the chronicle music critic at the time. austin contributed his eclectic theater and comedy recordings and, well, himself. those of you that know austin know that nothing more ne
government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o ass
of sentiment that causes us to focus even more on what we can do locally. in fact, this higher level of sentiment, as you'll hear from the police chief, has even caused one of the highest rates of gun return. certainly we paid some money for that, but he's going to tell you there are some individuals out there, in light of sandy hook, that returned their guns and without even asking for remuneration of those guns. and he'll explain that level of detail. but it was the highest level of gun return this past weekend that we were honored to share with our community partners in making sure that we get these guns off the streets. two pieces of legislation that we are introducing to the board of supervisors with the support of our police chief, our health department, and certainly being led by supervisor cohen whose district has experienced an inordinate amount of violence throughout this year. we talk about it all the time. what can we do? for one, the ammunition that has been designed especially by law enforcement for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and,
are, are going to perform for us. so, i hope you will stick around for that. only in san francisco treat and a little vision accompaniment from our favor fire boat. so, thank you all very much. please, please, enjoy this day. thank you. (applause) >> all right, 3 2,, 1, go. [cheering and applauding] ... >> good morning, everyone. thank you for being here. you know, as we look through this year, there's obviously some incredible events that have occurred. and for me as mayor of san francisco, i know that the chief and i and supervisor cohen and dr. campbell and the whole public health staff have always had dialogue and been concerned especially when there is an uptick in june of this year on violent crime and homicides in san francisco. and, so, we've been working together on creating a program which i announced some months ago, the ipo program, the ability to work on things that would interrupt and intervene earlier in the behavior patterns of people that would be both victims and perpetrators of violent crime in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system
at sandy hook elementary school last week was truly horrifying. and painful for all of us to sit back and witness. but i'm here today not to speak of last week's events in connecticut, but i'm here today because of the phone calls that i regularly get from many of the police officers that are here in this room today in the middle of the night. department officers informing me and alerting me of the violent shootings that are happening right here in our own neighborhood. i'm here today because i have personally visited too many families as they grieve the loss of loved ones, largely due to gun violence. i'm here today because of the time that i've spent at general hospital consoling innocent victims of gun violence, some as young as five years old. i'm here because we have to do more and use every legislative and executive power that are available to us to continue to address the causes as well as the impacts of senseless gun violence occurring in our neighborhoods. now, what we know is that many of the shootings that are occurring are increasingly involving young adults under the age
john: are your instincts wrong? instinct tells us flying is dangerous, charity helps the poor, price gouging is evil and every adult should vote. tonight we challenge your instincts, who helps the poor more, charity or business? the charity or business? >> charity.harity. >> charity. john: is that true? self-interest.at true? more people than charity ever did.pe has. then, what scares you? are you scared of flying? bis is much more likely to killl you. and finally, it's your duty. i i say, say some of you shouldn't vote. because o some of you don't know much. >> do you know who this is? >> looks like will ferrell. john: do you both? maybe you shouldn't if you don't know who these people are. >speaker you are correct. john: your instinct is probably wrong. that's our show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. [applauding] john: what does your brain tl you that america should do about our problem? we have plenty. a lot of people are poor. we should spread the wealth around. i hear busesses raise prices and gouge people. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ou
there is good news some schools where teachers can be fired kids learn. >> give us over schools and the rare in america we will outperform the other schools in five years. how good our charter schools? >> unions say they are four problem kids. >> up until now the adults have run the show and make us stupid in america. school spending has tripled over the past 40 years. three sped much more than other countries but what do we get? student learning? no improvement. look at it. there is the line. 40 years the scores have been flat much more money no improvement that there is good news and around america very cool things are starting to happen. >> school is boring. >> knollwood is not. >> as it is. i went to school. grade school was boring so was high school and so was princeton except for the party part of fourth grade? we have to learn reading and writing and that is work. >> reading is work but it is rocking also. >> they say school is fun? how is it fun to learn? >> they teach us enough on ways to make you look forward to going to school in the morning? >> yes. >> the attend a new charter sc
at west point especially the west point band to allow us to join in this holiday season. for all of us as fox news, i'm jon scott, have a great holiday and great night. ♪ ♪ >> steve: welcome everybody to "fox & friends" christmas show. thank you for letting us share this holiday with you and your family. >> gretchen: we have amazing lineup for you billie ray cyrus is here. paula deen is is here. [ applause ] and all of your favorite permanents from the fox news channel they are going to stop by as well. >> brian: first, we want to welcome our very special audience who is here today. you have been affected by hurricane sandy and not in a positive way. but out of the destruction there is is some amazing stories of inspiration. some of you will share those stories and i look forward to hearing them and so does our audience. >> we also want to welcome everyone watching at home while you kids out there. we have a very special surprise for you. so ask mom and dad if you can stay up a little later. >> we also want to say hello to everyone serving overseas who can't be home for christmas.
for fox and friends. ♪ merry christmas everyone and thank you for waking up with us on christmas morning. it is a business morning for everyone. santa claus, too. he's in our green room and passed out control. he's had a busy, busy night. >> and had egg knog. there is a divorce he can make to make sure he doesn't snore. >> all of the kiddies at home want to send us an e-mail at friends and folks and friends.com. santa will be asking your question and if you have trouble putting together gadgets and toys . the only tech questions, send them to me . personal tech help line . you are giving santa a break. he needs it. >> i want to know if you have your gifts wrapped for you. did santa wrap your gifts for you or not. >> we did, too. >> mine were not wrapped. i was like in the late shift. >> mine were always crapped. >> i think in the south santa doesn't wrap. maybe you were a bad kid. i was like the last one and he was tired of wrapping at that point. send us christmas traditions and we'll talk about the crazier ones out there. first live look at st. peter's square in vatican city, pope bene
everybody, i'm angela miles, and thank you for joining us on today's first business. coming up in this edition, we are getting into the spirit of giving by checking in on charities. how americans are opening up their wallets, and why some nonprofits are facing a new dilemma. plus, we'll take a look at the advances parents are making to help their children become financially savvy. college costs continue to soar. our guest is dishing out tips on cutting the expense. why he says you don't have to be at the top of your class to find a top scholarship. and, let the holiday movie season commence. a review of some of the biggest and smallest flicks to hit the big screen in the coming months. nonprofit organizations are facing a big dilemna: many of their donors are elderly, in poor health and there are fewer of them each year, and there aren't enough new donors to pick up the slack. in our cover story, how one non-profit is using business strategies to make a difference. the privately-funded pritzker military library is one of chicago's best-kept secrets. "our biggest problem is no o
. that it force is used to the community review occurs, not happened. >> none of these would cost money and has been pointed out tasers would cost money if you talk about the training and the training on using the cart rages and all of this will cost significant resources. deescalation works. it works every day in san francisco. it works at psychiatric emergency service and social service agency and drop in center and door alley and west side and other places we did a comprehensive review of the tasers of the literature. >> please continue briefly to finish up. >> and we looked at all of the studies that had been done the last time that this came around. what we found over and over again is that the tasers increased fatalities. there were some that mentioned that it decreased. fatalities every one of those studies were funded by taser international. of the independent studies not funded by the people profiting off these weapons, they found things like the 2009 ucsf study that the deaths more than doubles in the first year and the following years the number of shootings decrease but stayed above
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 226 (some duplicates have been removed)